Russia-Ukraine talks show ‘positive results’: Kyiv negotiator

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14,000 Russian soldiers killed in Ukraine war: President Zelensky

KYIV: Delegations from Ukraine and Russia had held a third round of talks, which brought some progress with regard to opening of humanitarian corridors.

The talks were held in Belarus on Monday, according to a Ukrainian negotiator.

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Taking to Twitter, Kyiv’s presidential advisor Mikhailo Podolyak said that they had achieved some positive results concerning the logistics of humanitarian corridors.

Russia’s lead negotiator, on the other hand, had said that the third round of talks with Ukraine had not met expectations.

In a televised remarks, Russian delegation head Vladimir Medinsky had said that their expectations from negotiations were not fulfilled. We hope that we will be able next time to take a more significant step forward, he added.

Podolyak, earlier in the day, had demanded of Russia to stop attacks on civilians on Monday before the start of the third round of talks with Russians.

He further said they would begin talking to representatives of a country which seriously believes violence against civilians is an argument.

Last week, Russia had declared a partial ceasefire with the view to allow humanitarian corridors out of the Ukrainian cities of Volnovakha and Mariupol.

The Russia’s defence ministry said that from 10am Moscow time (0700 GMT), the Russian side declares a ceasefire besides opening of humanitarian corridors to allow civilians to leave Volnovakha and Mariupol.

Meanwhile, Russia had blocked Facebook and some other websites. Moscow also passed a law that gave the country much stronger powers to crack down on journalism. As a result, Bloomberg, BBC and other foreign media suspended reporting in the country.

The war had rendered over one million people refugees. Russia is now facing a barrage of sanctions that are increasingly isolating Moscow.

Russia said its invasion is a “special operation” to arrest elements it regards as dangerous nationalists, and has denied targeting civilians.